How can Pomodore help you shave a Yak?

Two terms in the title that needs clarification.  Pomodoro is a technique for managing a task completion, or simply time. Yak shaving is a situation that everyone finds himself every now and than when we are trying to solve a problem in a wrong way. Usually it happens when we create a chain of tasks that will lead to a solution and we keep on repeating it until we get somewhere. Eventually we could end up with a very crazy solution after a long period of time.

Yak shaving

An example of Yak shaving I found myself in not too long ago.

I found myself doing a Ruby on Rails development on a Mac box. As I used older version of MacOS I had an older version of Ruby compiler. To use latest version of Rails I had to get newer version of Ruby. To get that I needed to install that via Mac Ports or something similar. While trying to install Mac Ports I found myself missing some of the development files that stopped Mac Ports from installation. It turned out that those files where in XCode. I had to find XCode that is going to work on my machine. Turned out that older version is available on Apple Dev website, all I need is to sign-in. I had an account, but forgot the password. Then I tried to retrieve a password and that didn’t work. After some battles I finally got a XCode on my box.  It was still Mac Ports impossible to install Mac Ports thought. That took me along time. Eventually I ended up installing VM image of Ubuntu and developing on Linux VM.

I think that being developer, the Yak Shaving problem is very irritating and could lead into a lot of wasted hours. When working in a pair,  the Yak issue will not appear that often. There is always a second pair of eyes to validate the sanity of the task in progress. It doesn’t eliminate the Yak entirely as I found out with some peers 🙂

When working alone that is entirely different story. Because there is no one to run you ideas by, sometime I make a decisions that lead me into “the shaving“. I found myself wasting hours before realizing that it doesn’t make sense and taking step back.

Pomodoro, mmm, delicious

Not to long ago on a project I was working on, we used Pomodoro to keep us focus for a period of time. This simple technique combines 25 minutes of un-distractable time of work and a 5 minutes break. After 4 successful Pomodoros (25 minutes + 5 minutes break) we had a little longer break. While working in a pairs, Pomodoro was keeping us focus and safe from emails, phone calls and coffee breaks. The 5 minutes break gave us a lot of time to discuss the issues around the task/problem.

When working alone the 5 minutes break could be the excellent opportunity to talk with someone else about the problem or just take a step back and reflect on a solution. This eventually could lead into new ideas and most importantly into STOP shaving a Yak.

There is more to Pomodoro technique than just a sanity check from a yak shaving. There is a free PDF book that can be downloaded for free http://www.pomodorotechnique.com/resources/cirillo/ThePomodoroTechnique_v1-3.pdf and some other resources on the Pomodoro Technique web site.

Cheers, Gregster

Wordpress page load time tweaks ended in … failure

Why was I trying to speed it up on a first place. Well, some of you might be aware of the fact that me and my Family moved to Sydney. We will be here until May. My blog and my hosting is in UK. Broadband in Oz is far below random average back in UK. I was never bothered to check my own blog for response time as it was always good. Trying to load my blog main page I was shocked waiting for few minutes for it to appear on a screen.

The beginning and general enthusiasm

What I did is a little analysis on a page with Firefox and YSlow. It turned out that a lot of time takes for JavaScript files to load. About 8 files that are not too big but for some bizarre reason takes ages. YSlow suggested to combine them into one file and compress.

That’s fine. Sounds like a plan. Grab all the JS files combine them into one and then compress. Turned out more complicated than one would think.

There was no JavaScript that comes with bare WordPress to compress and combine with other files. The JavaScript that I got on my blog was the one from additional plugins I have installed.

After a quick googling I found out that there is a WordPress plugin for JavaScript compression. It is called WP_JS. It works quite sweet, whenever you got a JS file and you need to add it to your post all you do you put this line:

<script src="<?php wp_js('path/to/js/file.js'); ?>"type="text/javascript"></script>

The problem with this one is that it will only work for a files from within your current theme folder.

JS files I would like to compress into one file are those inside plugins. Seems like WP JS doesn’t have access to that. Oh well, first hack then. Copy all the files to one folder that would be accessible to JavaScript compression plugin.

imageWhen I finished I had to go trough all the plugins and comment out the JavaScript imports. Finished with this task I moved to getting all the JS files in a header as one compressed file. So in other hands all the plugin JavaScripts would be compressed and loaded in one file.

When I done that it turned out that there are JavaScript errors on a page. Some plugins are spitting more to a HTML then just a JavaScript imports and they depend on a stuff inside those imports. In other words, one big mess. Impossible to decouple and extract as one file.

Good idea

It would be absolutely awesome if I could apply some sort of a filter for a HTML content before it is being spit out to a browser, grab all the JS imports, create one big JS on a flight, compress it and then send to a browser.

With a knowledge I got about WordPress it seems impossible at the moment.

Failure and what I ended up with

So I ended with disabling plugins. There is only few enabled with very little JavaScript.

Last final solution is to redo the plugins so the JavaScript they are using will be suitable for a single file compression.

I don’t have time for that, so … no plugins instead 🙂

Take care, Gregster

Ps. I’m not going to try to achieve anything similar with CSS :-